Ethics, government, and the economy

Should a human government follow the ethical principles described by Jesus in the Sermon on the Mount? The answer, in a word, is, no.

Jesus calls his followers to love their enemies, to turn the other cheek and to go the extra mile, to forgive those who sin against them and do good to those who persecute them. But the government is established by God to protect its citizens, to punish those who do wrong, to uphold the law. Instead of forgiving the sinner, the government must punish the wrongdoer, “eye for eye and tooth for tooth,” rendering justice on behalf of all its people.

During the Baroque Era (or Enlightenment), European philosophers described human rights and said that governments exist to protect those rights. John Locke wrote about rights to life, liberty, and property. (Thomas Jefferson, writing the Declaration of Independence, would fudge the third right to “pursuit of happiness.”) Governments protect the rights of their citizens—they take life only from enemies who attack the country or from the worst of criminals who threaten the lives of others. Governments protect the liberty of their citizens, only depriving criminals of freedom, and then only for a term that fits the crime. Governments protect the property of their citizens. They may claim some property as fines for misdemeanors, other property as fees for services, other property as taxes, and still other property to provide services such as roads. In general, though, governments take no more than they must take from their citizens. When they become overbearing, when they stop respecting the rights of their citizens, the citizens are entitled to change their government, to find new leaders who will respect and protect their rights.

Philosophers spoke of a social contract between citizens and their government. Citizens agree among themselves what they want the government to do, and they use their property and their energy to help the government accomplish these goals. If citizens want public schools, they agree to pay taxes to support those schools, and they agree to send their children to those schools. For protection from foreign enemies and domestic criminals, citizens are willing to limit some of their own freedoms and property. For other services from the government, some citizens are willing to accept further limits. Among any group of citizens, a range of opinions will be found: some want the government to do more, and they are willing to pay more for those government services; others want to cede less to the government, and in return they are happy to receive fewer government services.

To some Americans (including Franklin Roosevelt and Bill Clinton), some problems are so big that only the government can address them. To other Americans (including Ronald Reagan), the government is the biggest problem and life improves when government is reduced and limited. Pure capitalism demands that the government not involve itself in the economy—capitalists say laissez-faire, leave it alone. Even Adam Smith in Wealth of Nations acknowledged that some government regulation is necessary for the good of all citizens. Under socialism, the government controls more aspects of its citizens’ lives; in return, it demands more property and restricts more freedom of those citizens. In a free market economy, the government regulates what must be regulated but leaves more freedom and more property in the hands of its citizens.

The question remains: which economic system is better for all the citizens of a nation: socialism, or a free market economy? J.

7 thoughts on “Ethics, government, and the economy

  1. All western governments incorporate elements of socialism. They regulate business for the good of the community, provide welfare to the poor, redistribute wealth to some extent through taxes. So I don’t believe it’s an either or situation. But a government without ethics will fail. I’m not saying it should be Jesus’s ethics…even individuals rarely implement those. But some ethics.

    Liked by 2 people

    • I agree with you about the need for ethics in government. This post, on the other hand, is part of a series where I am examining the difference between socialism and free-market capitalism, along with the danger of drifting from one into the other. Regulations on privately-owned businesses are not necessarily socialism. Even Adam Smith, in the Wealth of Nations (the primary argument for capitalism) acknowledged the need for some government regulation. Fair questions are raised about how much is good and how much is too much. J.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Good stuff, Salvageable. I prefer less government. It’s kind of ironic, in the midst of our state’s 8 month lockdown, many people are now unable to provide for themselves, still waiting for unemployment checks, and still waiting for congress to get around to sending us a second stimulus. For all intents and purposes, this is socialism. And right on schedule, we already have people heading for the soup kitchen and standing in the bread lines.

    Liked by 1 person

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