Assorted thoughts about Christmas

I have always enjoyed this time of year. The build-up to Christmas and the celebration of Christmas are both meaningful and fun. Being the curmudgeon that I am, though, I can still find reasons to complain even about the Christmas holidays.

When my favorite radio station started playing wall-to-wall Christmas music on the first of November, I was not ready for Christmas music. I switched stations, and even now, with barely a week left before Christmas, I have not bothered to switch back.

For me, Christmas is a celebration with the Church and with my family. In those two places we can be very specific about what we are celebrating. We still have plenty of secular items—the Christmas tree, stockings with gifts, and so on—but we are able to center our celebration on the Incarnation of Jesus Christ. When I am at work, observing Christmas is more awkward. On the one hand, I’m glad that they give us paid time off to celebrate the Christmas holiday. On the other hand, when we are in the building, I would just as soon focus on my job. Holiday decorations and parties and sing-alongs do not appeal to me at work, in part because these events have to reach the lowest common denominator so that no one is offended. I don’t object to people decorating their own work space with reminders of Christmas, but if I were to set up a nativity scene, other people might object. So I don’t decorate at all. If I can slip out and miss a party or a sing-along, that’s fine with me. I will do enough celebrating at church and with my family on Christmas Eve and Christmas Day and through the twelve days of Christmas.

Part of my family celebration involves a new decoration appearing each day through the season of Advent. We have so many items to deck the halls and living room and dining room and outdoors that I can bring one decoration out of storage each day. Some decorations are big projects—the lights on the house, for example, or the tree. Others are just a small touch—a stained glass decoration hanging in a window, or Christmas towels in the bathrooms. When they were younger, the children tried to predict which decoration would appear each day. Sometimes they searched the house looking for that day’s decoration. My oldest even checked in from college, trying to keep up with the daily decorations.

I have stopped sending out Christmas cards. I have neither the time nor the money to spend on that custom. I still get fifteen or twenty Christmas cards a year. Like my parents and my grandparents before me, I like to tape the cards to ribbons and hang those ribbons on the wall of the living room. About twelve years ago, I set aside that year’s cards, meaning to check them later for notes, and they sat around all year. When December came again, I decided to post them with the new cards from that year. Each year the collection grew a little larger. Now I have nearly two hundred Christmas cards on the living room wall and down the hall. I toss duplicate cards or any that I don’t think are attractive. Even when the other Christmas decorations have been put back into storage, the cards will stay up until the start of February.

Like decorations, songs and movies and special food are all part of the Christmas experience. Many of them have no direct connection to the Incarnation of our Lord, but they have all become part of the scenery for this time of year. I understand why many people struggle with depression during this holiday season. I can be prone to depression at times like this as well. By taking it easy, by not having high expectations, and especially by keeping the focus where it belongs and not on what I’m doing, I am generally successful at escaping negative feelings about Christmas. May all those who struggle find ways to do the same. J.

 

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